SUSAN SONTAG
[1933 - 2004] American author, playwright, art critic, film & theatre director

 
The camera makes everyone a tourist in other people's reality, and eventually in one's own. - Susan Sontag
in New York Review of Books
Using a camera appeases the anxiety which the work-driven feel about not working when they are on vacation and supposed to be having fun. They have something to do that is like a friendly imitation of work: they can take pictures. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
"Plato's Cave", (1977)
A photograph that brings news of some unsuspected zone of misery cannot make a dent in public opinion unless there is an appropriate context of feeling and attitude. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Photographs may be more memorable than moving images, because they are a neat slice of time, not a flow. Each still photograph is a privileged moment turned into a slim object that one can keep and look at again. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
A photograph is not an opinion. Or is it? - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Instead of just recording reality, photographs have become the norm for the way things appear to us, thereby changing the very idea of reality and of realism. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
To photograph a thing is to appropriate the thing photographed. - Susan Sontag
in 1973.
...The photographic safari is replacing the gun safari in East Africa...The photographer is now charging real beasts, beleagured and too rare to kill. Guns have metamorphosed into cameras in this earnest comedy, the ecology safari, because nature has ceased to be what it always has been - what people needed protection from. Now nature - tamed, endangered, mortal - needs to be protected from people. When we are afraid, we shoot. But when we are nostalgic, we take pictures. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Photography is an elegiac art, a twilight art. Most subjects photographed are, just by virtue of being photographed, touched with pathos. An ugly or grotesque subject may be moving because it has been dignified by the attention of the photographer. A beautiful subject can be the object of rueful feelings, because it has aged or decayed or no longer exists. All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person's (or thing's) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. - Susan Sontag
All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person's (or thing's ) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
...the very question of whether photography is or is not an art is essentially a misleading one. Although photography generates works that can be called art – it requires subjectivity, it can lie, it gives aesthetic pleasure -- photography is not, to begin with, an art form at all. Like language, it is a medium in which works of art (among other things) are made. Out of language, one can make scientific discourse, bureaucratic memoranda, love letters, grocery lists, and Balzac’s Paris. Out of photography, one can make passport pictures, weather photographs, pornographic pictures, X-rays, wedding pictures, and Atget’s Paris. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
...the images that have virtually unlimited authority in a modern society are mainly photographic images; and the scope of that authority stems from the properties peculiar to images taken by cameras. Such images are indeed able to usurp reality because first of all a photograph is not only an image (as a painting is an image), and interpretation of the real, it is also a trace, something directly stenciled off the real, like a footprint or a death mask. While a painting, even one that meets photographic standards of resemblance, is never more than the stating of an interpretation, a photograph is never less than the registering of an emanation (light waves reflected by objects) -- a material vestige of its subject in a way that no painting can be. Between two fantasy alternatives, that Holbein the Younger had lived long enough to have painted Shakespeare or that a prototype of the camera had been invented early enough to have photographed him, most Bardolators would choose the photograph. This is not because it would presumably show what Shakespeare really looked like, for even if the hypothetical photograph were faded, barely legible, a brownish shadow, we would probably still prefer it to another glorious Holbein. Having a photograph of Shakespeare would be like having a nail from the True Cross. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Photography has powers that no other image-system has ever enjoyed because, unlike the earlier ones, it in not dependent on an image maker. However carefully the photographer intervenes in setting up and guiding the image-making process, the process itself remains an optical-chemical or electronic one, the workings of which are automatic, the machinery for which will inevitably be modified to provide still more detailed and, therefore, more useful maps of the real....The primitive notion of the efficacy of images presumes that images possess the qualities of real things, but our inclination is to attribute to real things the qualities of an image. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Few people in this society share the primitive dread of cameras that comes from thinking of the photograph as a material part of themselves. But some trace of the magic remains: for example, in our reluctance to tear up or throw away the photograph of a loved one, especially of someone dead or far away....But the true modern primitivism is not to regard the image as a real thing; photographic images are hardly that real. Instead, reality has come to seem more and more like what we are shown by cameras. It is common now for people to insist about their experience of a violent event in which they were caught up -- a plane crash, a shoot-out, a terrorist bombing -- that ‘it seemed like a movie.’ This is said, other descriptions seeming insufficient, in order to explain how real it was. While many people in non-industrialized countries still feel apprehensive when being photographed, divining it to be some kind of trespass, an act of disrespect, a sublimated looting of the personality or the culture, people in industrialized countries seek to have their photographs taken -- feel that they are images, and are made real by photographs. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the cameradoes indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 6-7
By furnishing this already crowded world with a duplicate one of images, photography makes us feel that the world is more available than it really is. - Susan Sontag
Standing alone, photographs promise an understanding they cannot deliver. In the company of words, they take on meaning, but they slough off one meaning and take on another with alarming ease. - Susan Sontag
Surrealism lies at the heart of the photographic enterprise: in the very creation of a reality in the second degree, narrower but more dramatic than the one perceived by natural vision. - Susan Sontag
Though photographs, the world becomes a series of unrelated, free-standing particles; and history, past and present, a set of anecdotes and faits divers. The camera makes reality atomic, manageable, and opaque. It is a view of the world which denies interconnectedness, continuity, but which confers on each moment the character of a mystery. - Susan Sontag
Our very sense of situation is now articulated by the camera’s interventions. The omnipresence of cameras persuasively suggests that time consists of interesting events, events worth photographing. This, in turn, makes it easy to feel that any event, once underway, and whatever its moral character, should be allowed to complete itself—so that something else can be brought into the world, the photograph. - Susan Sontag
It seems positively unnatural to travel without taking a camera along... The very activity of taking pictures is soothing and assuages general feelings of disorientation that are likely to be exacerbated by travel. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
To take a photograph is to participate in another person's(or thing's) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time's relentless melt. - Susan Sontag
In America, the photographer is not simply the person who records the past, but the one who invents it. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
"Melancholy Objects"
Interpretation is the revenge of the intellect upon art. - Susan Sontag
1964
Certain glories of nature, for example. have been all but abandoned to the indefatigable attentions of amateur camera buffs. The image-surfeited are likely to find sunsets corny; they now look, alas, too much like photographs. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Recently, photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing - which means that, like every mass art form, photography is not practiced by most people as an art. It is mainly a social rite, a defense against anxiety, and a tool of power. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
The camera doesn't rape, or even possess, though it may presume, intrude, trespass, distort, exploit, and at the farthest reach of metaphor, assassinate-all activities that, unlike the sexual push and shove, can be conducted from a distance, and with some detachment. - Susan Sontag
Photography are minatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
The painter constructs, the photographer discloses. That is, the identification of the subject of a photograph always dominates our perception of it -- as it does not, necessarily, in a painting. The subject of Weston’s ‘Cabbage Leaf,’ taken in 1931, looks like a fall of gathered cloth; a title is needed to identify it. Thus, the image makes its point in two ways. The form is pleasing, and it is (surprise!) the form of a cabbage leaf. If it were gathered cloth, it wouldn’t be so beautiful. We already know that beauty, from the fine arts. Hence the formal qualities of style -- the central issue in painting -- are, at most, of secondary importance in photography, while what a photograph is of is always of primary importance. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
...to photograph is to frame, and to frame is to exclude. - Susan Sontag
In contrast to the written account-- which, depending on its complexity of thought, reference, and vocabulary, is pitched at a larger or smaller readership-- a photograph has only one language and is destined potentially for all. - Susan Sontag
Photographs objectify: the turn an event or a person into something that can be possessed. - Susan Sontag
While a painting, even one that meets photographic standards of resemblance, is never more than the stating of an interpretation, a photograph is never less than the registering of an emanation (light waves reflected by objects)-- a material vestigate of its subject in a way that no painting can be... Having a photograph of Shakespeare would be like having a nail from the True Cross. - Susan Sontag
Although photography generates works that can be called art-- it requires subjectivity, it can lie, it gives aesthetic pleasure-- photography is not, to begin with, an art form at all. Like language, it is a medium in which works of art (among other things) are made. - Susan Sontag
The two ideas are antithetical. Insofar as photography is (or should be) about the world, the photographer counts for little, but insofar as it is the instrument of intrepid, questioning subjectivity, the photographer is all. - Susan Sontag
In photographing dwarfs, you don't get majesty and beauty. You get dwarfs. - Susan Sontag
The authority of Arbus’s photographs derives from the contrast between their lacerating subject matter and their calm, matter-of-fact attentiveness. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs really are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
Still, there is something predatory in the act of taking a picture. To photograph people is to violate them, by seeing them as they never see themselves, by having knowledge of them they can never have; it turns people into objects that can be symbolically possessed. Just as the camera is a sublimation of the gun, to photograph someone is a sublimated murder - a soft murder, appropriate to a sad, frightened time. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 14-15
A photograph is both a pseudo-presence and a token of absence. Like a wood fire in a room, photographs - especially those of people, of distant landscapes and faraway cities, of the vanished past - are incitements to reverie. - Susan Sontag
The ultimate wisdom of the photographic image is to say, 'There is the surface. Now think - or rather feel, intuit - what is beyond it, what the reality must be like if it looks that way. 'Photographs, which cannot themselves explain anything, are inexhaustible invitations to deduction, speculation, and fantasy... The very muteness of what is, hypothetically, comprehensible in photographs is what constitutes their attraction and provocativeness. - Susan Sontag
Between photographer and subject, there has to be distance. The camera doesn’t rape or even possess, though it may presume, intrude, trespass, distort, exploit, and at farthest reach of methaphor, assassinate.... - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
But photographic seeing has to be constantly renewed with new shocks, whether of subject matter or technique, so as to produce the impression of violating ordinary vision. For, challenged by the revelations of photographers, seeing tends to accommodate to photographs. The avant-garde vision of Strand in the twenties, of Weston in the late twenties and early thirties, was quickly assimilated. Their rigorous closeup studies of plants, shells, leaves, time-withered trees, kelp, driftwood, eroded rocks, pelicans’ wings, gnarled cypress roots, and gnarled workers’ hands have become clichés of a merely photographic way of seeing. What it once took a very intelligent eye to see, anyone can see now. Instructed by photographs, everyone is able to visualize that once purely literary conceit, the geography of the body: for example, photographing a pregnant woman so that her body looks like a hillock, a hillock so that it looks like the body of a pregnant woman. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061
The painter constructs, the photographer discloses. - Susan Sontag
What is true of photographs is true of the world seen photographically. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 79
Like the collector, the photographer is animated by a passion that, even when it appears to be for the present, is linked to a sense of the past. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 77
Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 5
(...) Although there a sense which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as painting and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 6
To us, the difference between the photographer as an individual eye and the photographer as an objective recorder seems fundamental, the difference often regarded, mistakenly, as separating photography as art from photography as document. But both are logical extensions of what photography means: note-taking on, potentially, everything in the world, from every possible angle. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 176
The photographer was thought to be an acute but non-interfering observer – a scribe, not a poet. But as people quickly discovered that nobody takes the same picture of the same thing, the supposition that cameras furnish an impersonal, objective image yielded to the fact that photographs are evidence not only of what’s there but of what an individual sees, not just a record but an evaluation of the world. It became clear that there was not just a simple activity called seeing (recorded by, aided by cameras) but ‘photographic seeing’, which was both a new way for people to see and a new activity for them to perform. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 88
As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 8
Because each photograph is only a fragment, its moral and emotional weight depends on where it is inserted. A photograph changes according to the context in which it is seen: thus Smith’s Minamata photographs will seem different on a contact sheet, in a gallery, in a political demonstration, in a police file, in a photographic magazine, in a book, on a living-room wall. Each o these situations suggest a different use for the photographs but none can secure their meaning. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 105
The camera can be lenient; it is can also expert at being cruel. But its cruelty only produces another kind of beauty, according to the surrealist preferences which rule photographic taste. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 104
(...) Along with people who pretty themselves for the camera, the unattractive and the disaffected have been assigned their beauty. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 103
Knowing a great deal about what is in the world (art, catastrophe, the beauties of nature) through photographic images, people are frequently disappointed, surprised, unmoved when the see the real thing. For photographic images tend to subtract feeling from something we experience at first hand and the feelings they do arouse are, largely, not those we have in real life. Often something disturbs us more in photographed form than it does when we actually experience it. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 168
It is not reality that photographs make immediately accessible, but images. For example, now all adults can know exactly how they and their parents and grandparents looked as children – a knowledge not available to anyone before the invention of cameras, not even to that tine minority among whom it was customary to commission paintings of their children. Most of these portraits were less informative than any snapshot. And even the very wealthy usually owned just one portrait of themselves or any of their forebears as children, that is, image of one moment of childhood, whereas it is common to have many photographs of oneself, the camera offering the possibility of possessing a complete record, at all ages. - Susan Sontag , On Photography by Susan Sontag , ISBN: 0385267061 , Page: 165
Travel becomes a strategy for accumulating photographs. - Susan Sontag
The history of photography could be recapitulated as the struggle between two different imperatives: beatification, which comes from the fine arts, and thr truth telling. - Susan Sontag
Black and White Magazine
Today everything exists to end in a photograph. - Susan Sontag
Most of Arbus's work lies within the Warhol aesthetic, that is, defines itself in relation to the twin poles of boringness and freakishness; but it doesn't have the Warhol style. Arbus had neither Warhol's narcissism and genius for publicity nor the self-protective blandness with which he insulates himself from the freaky nor his sentimentality. It is unlikey that Warhol, who comes from a working-class family, ever felt any ambivalence toward success which afflicted the children of the Jewish upper middle classes in the 1960s. To someone raised as a Catholic, like Warhol (and virtually everyone in his gang), a fascination with evil comes much more genuinely than it does to someone from a Jewish background. Compared with Warhol, Arbus seems strikingly vulnerable, innocent--and certainly more pessimistic. Her Dantesque vision of the city (and the suburbs) has no reserves of irony. Although much of Arbus's material is the same as that depicted in, say, Warhol's Chelsea Girls (1966)...For Arbus, both freaks and Middle America were equally exotic: a boy marching in a pro-war parade and a Levittown housewife were as alien as a dwarf or a transvestite; lower-middle-class suburbia was as remote as Times Square, lunatic asylums, and gay bars. Arbus's work expressed her turn against what was public (as she experienced it), conventional, safe, reassuring--and boring--in favor of what was private, hidden, ugly, dangerous, and fascinating. These contrasts, now, seem almost quaint. What is safe no long monopolizes public imagery. The freakish is no longer a private zone, difficult of access. People who are bizarre, in sexual disgrace, emotionally vacant are seen daily on the newsstands, on TV, in the subways. Hobbesian man roams the streets, quite visible, with glitter in his hair. - Susan Sontag