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ALLAN DOUGLASS COLEMAN
Photographs are of course about their makers, and are to be read for what they disclose in that regard no less than for what they reveal of the world as their makers comprehend, invent, and describe it. - Allan Douglass Coleman

As members of a photographic culture, we lug around a lot of psychic and emotional baggage: the past is always with us, in the form of our photographs, which we tell as we might a rosary, wearing them smooth with the fingering of our eyes. Photographs are small and weightless objects in comparison with our larger possessions, but unlike cars and TV sets and other material goods we cannot trade our photographs in and break our attachments to them without considerable pain. It is no coincidence that one cardinal rule in brainwashing is to remove from the victim all photographs of himself and people he has known... - Allan Douglass Coleman - Light Readings, 1979

[the snapshot] is an interruption of the flow of events and of time, an interruption whose purpose is to preserve rather than observe. - Allan Douglass Coleman - New York Times, December 30, 1973

The past is always with us, in the form of our photographs, which we feel as we might a rosary, wearing them smooth with the fingering of our eyes. - Allan Douglass Coleman

What a photograph shows us is how a particular thing could be seen, or could be made to look—at a specific moment, in a specific context, by a specific photographer employing specific tools. - Allan Douglass Coleman

Any photographer worth his/her salt—that is, any photographer of professional caliber, in control of the craft, regardless of imagistic bent—can make virtually anything “look good.” Which means, of course, that she or he can make virtually anything “look bad”—or look just about any way at all. After all, that is the real work of photography: making things look, deciding how a thing is to appear in the image. - Allan Douglass Coleman

..the battle for the acceptance of photography as Art was not only counter-productive but counter-revolutionary. The most important photography is most emphatically not Art. - Allan Douglass Coleman

The simple fact is this: There are no neutral photographs. - Allan Douglass Coleman

We’ve spent now about 150 years trying to convince ourselves that photographs are reliable evidence, some unimpeachable slice of the real world. That was a myth from the very beginning. - Allan Douglass Coleman

The morphology of photography would have been vastly different had photographs resisted the urge to acquire the credentials of esthetic respectability for the medium, and instead simply pursued it as a way of producing evidence of intelligent life on earth. - Allan Douglass Coleman

Neutrality is in itself a political stance, favoring as it does the status quo. Why have we permitted this mythology of objectivity/neutrality to be pulled over our eyes? Why do we tolerate it from the mouths of those who, more than any, should know better—the photographers themselves? - Allan Douglass Coleman

Photographing appears to be nothing more than concretized seeing, and seeing is believing. - Allan Douglass Coleman

To work in the directorial mode requires a photographer to violate more than a hundred years of trust in order to engage voluntarily in active deception. As a rule it involves an image-maker in a symbology that is not “found” but consciously chosen, imposed, and explored. - Allan Douglass Coleman

Photography is, in its relation to the casual camera user, an inordinately generous medium. Most anyone who exposes a goodly amount of film (or even a small amount regularly) ends up with a certain proportion of negative which, appropriately rendered in print form, could provide images of at least passing interest. - Allan Douglass Coleman

We must come to understand the extent to which lenses shape, filter, and otherwise alter the data which passes through them the extreme degree to which the lens itself informs our information. This influence, though radical in many cases, often manifests itself subtly. Yet even the most blatant distortions tend to be taken for granted as a result of the enduring cultural confidence in the essential trustworthiness and impartiality of what is in fact a technology resonant with cultural bias and highly susceptible to manipulation. - Allan Douglass Coleman

It is no coincidence that one cardinal rule in brainwashing is to remove from the victim all photographs of himself and people he has known. - Allan Douglass Coleman

More and more, lately, I’ve seen shows—not just in galleries, but even in museums—by young photographers hot off the press whose bodies of work have little to say and lack any distinction beyond their statistically unique amalgamations of facets of their mentors and other influences. In their early or middle twenties, they already have lists of exhibition and publication credits as long as your arm. Many have already been academically recycled and are actually teaching, thus perpetuating this syndrome. - Allan Douglass Coleman

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